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Meningitis Training Resources

25 October 2013 in Classroom Training, Featured Articles, First Aid, Instructor, Online Training

MeningitisThere are many resources on Meningitis available at the Meningitis Now website.  Worth a look for all instructors and a link is in the student download area so you can refer to the site and the link while training.  Meningitis Now are committed to raising awareness of meningitis and the work they. Whether you are looking for more information for teaching, you and your family, or you would like to help us raise awareness in your community they have lots of information to help.  On their website at www.meningitisnow.org/how-we-help/resources you will find lots of resources to learn more about Meningitis and also find out more about supporting them in their work.

Biphasic Anaphylactic Response – a second later reaction to a trigger

16 August 2012 in Classroom Training, Featured Articles, First Aid, Instructor, Online Training

Biphasic response is where there are two separate and distinct responses that are separated in time.  There would be

EpiPen Auto-injector for Anaphylaxis Treatment

EpiPen Auto-injector for Anaphylaxis Treatment

an immediate reaction to the trigger which is then followed by a recurrence of symptoms after an interval of time with no symptoms or signs.  This Anaphylactic reaction can happen happen between 2 and 72 hours so can happen after discharge from hospital. These second reactions can occur in as many of 20 percent of cases.  The biphasic reaction can be less severe than, equally severe as, or more severe than the initial reaction, ranging from mild symptoms to a fatality.

Biphasic reactions happen in up to one-third of patients who have had a near-fatal reactions. These patients seem to have fully recovered when severe bronchospasm suddenly recurs.  Predicting if a second reaction will occur is not easy but the more severe the reaction or when two auto injectors are needed the higher the chance of a recurrence.    Read the rest of this entry →

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